How to put music on a webpage

When I wanted to put a mp3 file on my BLOG, I met a problem. I can only put a link instead of a playing control panel.
Now, I got a way to make it works as what I want.

the embed html

below is the example html code for the embed tag

<embed src="soundfile.mid" hidden="false" border="0" width="310" height="45" autostart="true" autoplay="true" loop="true" volume="75%">

Break down of the example html source code shown as below:

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Resolution Guide

Resolution Guide for Monitors, Laptops, Televisions and Projectors
You’ve seen the confusing alphabet soup of acronyms describing the various resolutions for monitors, laptop displays, LCD and plasma televisions, as well as projectors, yet you probably still don’t know what it all means. Click on this hyperlink for an article that explains resolution and includes charts that match the alphabet with the numbers.
Resolution – What is it?
What Are Common Resolutions for Plasmas, Monitors, Notebooks, and Projectors?
Briefly stated, sharpness and clarity of the picture on screen is determined by its resolution, which is the sharpness of the image projected based on the number of pixels. Resolution is measured in the number of pixels horizontally multiplied by the number of pixels vertically. The higher number of pixels, the better. Plasma screens, projectors and LCD screens have a fixed number of pixels, referred to as the “native resolution,” or the resolution at which the display device does not have to expand or compress the input signal. This is the device’s optimum resolution. LCD images used in front projectors and rear-projection monitors typically offer XGA (1024 x 1024 x 768 pixels) or SXGA (1280 x 1024 pixels) resolution. Front projection monitors also use SVGA (800 x 600 pixels).

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Our View on Response Times

The Truth About Response Time
In our continuing effort to provide up-to-the-minute information to consumers, our editors wish to shed light on the multitude of numbers (or specifications) that accompany advertisements, brochures, user manuals, etc. regarding LCD monitors. Amid the cacophony of digits large and small appears one expression that is particularly important, but often overlooked. This mysterious number represents image response time and is articulated in terms milliseconds (ms), such as 12ms, 16ms, 24ms and so on. Response time is the screen’s signal reaction speed, or the time it takes for a liquid crystal panel to go from total white to total black and then back again. A 16ms LCD monitor corresponds to 63 images per second, while 12ms is equivalent to 83 images a second.

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Choosing a LCD Flat Panel Monitor

The world market for flat panel displays exploded to nearly $38-billion last year with projections of 18-percent growth for each of the next three years. According to the October 1, 2003 issue of Business Economics magazine, few – if any – markets this size are growing at such high and sustained rates. The reasons are obvious. Flat panel monitors employ TFT (Thin Film Transistors) technology that creates gorgeous images. And the attractive, thin-bezel design has captured the imagination of everyone who values style and substance. Consequently, virtually everyone is abandoning their CRT monitors and racing to buy flat panels – and prices are dropping fast. To help you decide which sleek, ultra stylish flat panel monitor fits your needs, our editors have compiled this handy (it’s even easier than plug and play!) LCD flat panel buying guide.

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Tune Up Your Windows XP Machine

Stan Miastkowski
From the June 2004 issue of PC World magazine
Windows reminds me all too often of those finicky foreign sports cars of decades past. If you don’t spend time tweaking, maintaining, and tuning it, it tends to run a little rough. A lot goes on under the hood to keep your XP-based PC running smoothly; but as you add, update, and delete software and data files, things can get sluggish. XP’s built-in tweaking tools can boost your PC’s performance.
Windows XP has fewer built-in tools than earlier versions of Windows, though the tools available are more full-featured. Other more-sophisticated and automatic tune-up tools can be found in various suites and stand-alone utilities, as discussed in “The Trouble-Free PC.” But if you’re frugal, their cost (up to $90) may give you pause. XP’s built-in tools, along with a few free add-ons, should be sufficient for most users and most situations.
If you’re using an earlier version of Windows, consult “Get a Free Tune-Up for Your Windows PC.” And if you’re up for a more extensive overhaul, check out “Optimize Your PC for Faster Start-Up Times” first.

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Bloglet – Good Blog Subscription Provider

Applied for bloglet service.
Anyone can enter his email to it to get the updated post everyday.
It is free and you can unsubscribe any time.
Bloglet is a free service that sends readers a daily email with all of the updates to the sites to which they subscribe. If there have been no updates, an email is not sent. To use Bloglet for your weblog, go to the Bloglet website and sign up for a new account and follow the instructions to add a weblog. Click on the question mark symbols next to the form entry fields for clarification on how to fill them in. A couple are a little bit tricky. On your main Bloglet account page find the list of your weblogs. Click on the code icon to the right of the pencil and trash can icons to get the code to use to place on your weblog. Copy and paste the code where you want the form to appear on your index and archive templates.

Update: 2014.02.07
It is not a service site anymore. Simply another blog only.

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