Currently Viewing Posts in Software

Build RAID 1

I used my old 60GB harddisk, which replaced by previously mentioned 160GB new disk, to made a RAID1 array with another 40GB harddisk. Actual capacity I can use is 40GB. 20GB is wasted.
Following is the technical explaination of RAID Level 1
Common Name(s): RAID 1; RAID 1 with Duplexing.
Technique(s) Used: Mirroring or Duplexing
Description: RAID 1 is usually implemented as mirroring; a drive has its data duplicated on two different drives using either a hardware RAID controller or software (generally via the operating system). If either drive fails, the other continues to function as a single drive until the failed drive is replaced. Conceptually simple, RAID 1 is popular for those who require fault tolerance and don’t need top-notch read performance. A variant of RAID 1 is duplexing, which duplicates the controller card as well as the drive, providing tolerance against failures of either a drive or a controller. It is much less commonly seen than straight mirroring.
z_raid1
Illustration of a pair of mirrored hard disks, showing how the
files are duplicated on both drives. (The files are the same as
those in the RAID 0 illustration, except that to save space I have
reduced the scale here so one vertical pixel represents 2 kiB.)

Continue reading “Build RAID 1”

Canadian Tax Software

taxabacus

I sent my TAX forms to CRA today.

Now I want to introduce some Canadian TAX Software.

www.cutetax.ca
Free without printing.

www.taxcel.ca
Unlimited Tax returens, $8 only.

www.mytaxexpress.com
Free download, free while income under $25,000. $6.08 per person.

www.genutax.ca
Once you purchase GenuTax, annual tax updates for future years are free. You will be able to prepare your tax returns for 2005, 2006, and beyond, at no additional charge.
The only risk is that GenuTax is closed.

www.taxtron.ca
Free under $30,000. $11.88 each.

I filled in the form and calculated return myself, use the Tax software as double check tool.
Know more about tax, you will save more.

Resolution Guide

Resolution Guide for Monitors, Laptops, Televisions and Projectors
You’ve seen the confusing alphabet soup of acronyms describing the various resolutions for monitors, laptop displays, LCD and plasma televisions, as well as projectors, yet you probably still don’t know what it all means. Click on this hyperlink for an article that explains resolution and includes charts that match the alphabet with the numbers.
Resolution – What is it?
What Are Common Resolutions for Plasmas, Monitors, Notebooks, and Projectors?
Briefly stated, sharpness and clarity of the picture on screen is determined by its resolution, which is the sharpness of the image projected based on the number of pixels. Resolution is measured in the number of pixels horizontally multiplied by the number of pixels vertically. The higher number of pixels, the better. Plasma screens, projectors and LCD screens have a fixed number of pixels, referred to as the “native resolution,” or the resolution at which the display device does not have to expand or compress the input signal. This is the device’s optimum resolution. LCD images used in front projectors and rear-projection monitors typically offer XGA (1024 x 1024 x 768 pixels) or SXGA (1280 x 1024 pixels) resolution. Front projection monitors also use SVGA (800 x 600 pixels).

Continue reading “Resolution Guide”

Our View on Response Times

The Truth About Response Time
In our continuing effort to provide up-to-the-minute information to consumers, our editors wish to shed light on the multitude of numbers (or specifications) that accompany advertisements, brochures, user manuals, etc. regarding LCD monitors. Amid the cacophony of digits large and small appears one expression that is particularly important, but often overlooked. This mysterious number represents image response time and is articulated in terms milliseconds (ms), such as 12ms, 16ms, 24ms and so on. Response time is the screen’s signal reaction speed, or the time it takes for a liquid crystal panel to go from total white to total black and then back again. A 16ms LCD monitor corresponds to 63 images per second, while 12ms is equivalent to 83 images a second.

Continue reading “Our View on Response Times”

Choosing a LCD Flat Panel Monitor

The world market for flat panel displays exploded to nearly $38-billion last year with projections of 18-percent growth for each of the next three years. According to the October 1, 2003 issue of Business Economics magazine, few – if any – markets this size are growing at such high and sustained rates. The reasons are obvious. Flat panel monitors employ TFT (Thin Film Transistors) technology that creates gorgeous images. And the attractive, thin-bezel design has captured the imagination of everyone who values style and substance. Consequently, virtually everyone is abandoning their CRT monitors and racing to buy flat panels – and prices are dropping fast. To help you decide which sleek, ultra stylish flat panel monitor fits your needs, our editors have compiled this handy (it’s even easier than plug and play!) LCD flat panel buying guide.

Continue reading “Choosing a LCD Flat Panel Monitor”

  • Archives